Taming the Wild Horses: Digital Fabrication in Singapore

Translation Algorithm

In collaboration with computer scientists in Singapore (SUTD) I developed a 3-axis digital-to physical translation algorithm for generating high fidelity planar construction prototypes. The challenge is to determine when to switch axes along curved surfaces. With complex geometry, such as a horse, the algorithm needs to balance structural integrity, assembly order, and description accuracy.

 


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Assembly Motion Tracking

I used motion tracking to explore how this kind of design production system could be further automated with robotic assembly. It was found that humans make many micro-adjustments during assembly to fit parts together. They pushed and pull the parts, shaking them into place, and adjusted adjacent parts to stabilize the structure.

 Variable slot width, left; tapered and filleted slot geometry, right.

Variable slot width, left; tapered and filleted slot geometry, right.

Instead of programming a robot to make these complex motions, variable slot widths in the part design could be introduced based on part length that would provide the necessary flexibility for automated assembly.